Because of Kazakhstan, America puts it back in guard Russia

Following the latest developments in the country, the United States warned the Russian forces deployed on Thursday in Kazakhstan not to control the institutions of the former Soviet republic, noting that the world would monitor any violations of human rights.

In detail, US State Department spokesman Ned Price told reporters that the United States, frankly the whole world, will check to reveal any human rights violations, adding that his country is also looking to reveal any steps it may take. could pave the way for the control of Kazakhstan’s institutions.

Price confirmed that he will leave the government of Kazakhstan to justify his request for intervention by the Russian-led Collective Security Treaty Organization.

external interference

While the current head of the organization, the Armenian Prime Minister, Nikol Pashinyan, said the coalition has responded to a request stemming from outside interference.

Price also reiterated his call for Kazakhstan to address the problems that led to the riots sparked by rare mass demonstrations of its kind over high fuel prices.

peaceful solution to the crisis

In addition, the US Secretary of State, Anthony Blinken, made a phone call last Thursday with his Kazakh counterpart, Mukhtar Telebirdi, and called for a peaceful solution to the crisis and respect for the freedom of media.

Blinken stressed the United States’ full support for Kazakhstan’s constitutional institutions and the freedom of the media and advocated a peaceful solution to the crisis that respects human rights, Price said.

Anger at the increase in the price of fuel

Interestingly, the demonstrations were initially sparked by anger over rising fuel prices, but their scope quickly expanded, including opposition from former President Nursultan Nazarbayev, who still retains extensive powers in the former republic. Soviet, despite his resignation in 2019 after ruling the country for nearly three contracts.

Nazarbayev, 81, is widely regarded as the main political force in the capital, Nur-Sultan, which bears his name.

His family is also believed to control much of the country’s economy, the largest in Central Asia. However, the man did not appear in public nor has he made any statements since the protests began.

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