Komodo dragons threatened by climate change, report says: NPR


Komodo dragons threatened by climate change, report says: NPR

Taken in this picture in 2010, a Komodo dragon sneaks along the coast of Komodo Island, the natural habitat of the worldthe largest lizard.

Romeo Gacad/AFP via Getty Images


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Romeo Gacad/AFP via Getty Images


Taken in this picture in 2010, a Komodo dragon sneaks along the coast of Komodo Island, the natural habitat of the worldthe largest lizard.

Romeo Gacad/AFP via Getty Images

scaly and with forked tongues, Komodo dragons are the biggest lizards to appease walk the earth.

But their days here may be numbered.

AN new report by an international preserving biodiversity organization says the terrifying reptiles are approaching global become extinct.

According to the International Union for Preservation of Nature (IUCN) red List, a review of the health of tens of thousands of types over around the world, Komodo dragons have gone from ‘vulnerable’ to ‘endangered’.

Why is the Komodo dragon — of Varanus komodoensis – so threatened? Climate change.

Rising global temperatures and higher sea ​​level, IUCN says, shall reduce habitat of the Komodo dragon met at least 30% over the next 45 years.

“The idea that these prehistoric animals have moved one step closer to extinction in part in climate change is terrifying,” said Dr. Andrew Terry, conservationist director of the Zoological Society of London.

Komodo dragons are native to Indonesia and alone live in Komodo National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and the nearby island of Flores, according to IUCN.

“While the subpopulation in Komodo National Park is currently stable and well protected, Komodo dragons outside protected areas in Flores being also threatened by significant habitat loss due to ongoing human activities,” the report said says.

Sharks and rays face major threats

The red list update, released on Saturday and one day after the IUCN World Conservation Congress of start went in Marseille, carries other bad news.

Of the shark and ray species die tracked by IUCN, about 37% is now threatened with become extinct.


A zebra shark swims in the aquarium of the Pacific ocean in long beach, california, in 2012. The zebra shark is listed as “endangered” by the IUCN.

Joe Klamar/AFP via Getty Images


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A zebra shark swims in the aquarium of the Pacific ocean in long beach, california, in 2012. The zebra shark is listed as “endangered” by the IUCN.

Joe Klamar/AFP via Getty Images

All of die endangered species are overfished, the group says, while some also face loss of habitat and are affected by climate change.

It demonstrates the inability of governments to die manage populations well in the worldoceans, according to IUNC, but the report also includes a major success story of types of management.

a revival of endangered tuna species offers hope

Of the seven most commercially fished tuna species, four of they — including albacore and bluefin tuna — showed signs of recovery in the latest judgement.

According to IUNC, the improvement below die species was the result of successful attempts to combat illegal fishing and enforcement more sustainable fishing quotas.


Took a picture in 2014 shows a salesperson die holding a white tuna for sale in the auction house at the Sydney Fish Market in Sydney.

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Took a picture in 2014 shows a salesperson die holding a white tuna for sale in the auction house at the Sydney Fish Market in Sydney.

Peter Parks/AFP via Getty Images

“These Red List ratings are proof that sustainable fishing is approaching work, with very longterm advantages for livelihoods and biodiversity,” said Dr. Bruce Collette, President of Tuna and Billfish Specialist Group of the IUCN Species Survival Commission. Migrating Tuna Species over thousands of kilometers, so coordinating their management worldwide is also key.”

Nevertheless, the group says many regional tuna populations remain significantly depleted due to in participate in overfishing.

Read More: World News

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