Home Auto “Nissan to Meet Requirements for U.S. EV Tax Credits Starting 2026”

“Nissan to Meet Requirements for U.S. EV Tax Credits Starting 2026”

Nissan is aiming to comply with US local sourcing rules for electric vehicle tax credits from 2026 by consolidating platforms and drivetrains for more competitive EVs. This will include offering six EV nameplates in the US market, including a next-generation Leaf hatchback and the Ariya crossover, as well as four new models made for the Nissan and Infiniti brands at its Canton, Mississippi, plant. Nissan’s efforts to tap into the tax credits offered under the Inflation Reduction Act will be achieved through compliance with rules on final assembly, content from foreign entities of concern, and the localization of battery components and minerals. The US localization plan will include making electric powertrains locally, potentially revamping the Decherd, Tennessee, engine plant to make EV units, and possibly using a second source for batteries in the US. Nissan expects more than 40 percent of its US sales to be full electric by 2030, up from an earlier prediction of just 40 percent.

Nissan is also raising its outlook for EV sales in Europe, now targeting 98 percent of its volume in 2030, compared with an earlier goal of 75 percent in that timeframe. Globally, Nissan expects to get 44 percent of its sales from EV or e-Power vehicles by 2030, up from an earlier vision of 40 percent announced in November 2021 under its Ambition 2030 plan. To achieve this, Nissan is streamlining EV engineering by simplifying powertrain designs, consolidating platforms, and reducing the number of powertrains and EV variants. The company is also shifting to software-defined vehicles, deriving revenue from in-vehicle services in the US and European markets, and expanding the functionality and frequency of over-the-air vehicle software updates.

Nissan has been investing billions of dollars in its electric vehicle initiatives in recent years, and is now getting ready for the harvesting. The automaker is aiming to comply with US local sourcing rules for electric vehicle tax credits from 2026, and is expecting more than 40 percent of its US sales to be full electric by 2030, as well as 98 percent of its European sales. Globally, Nissan is expecting 44 percent of its sales from EV or e-Power vehicles by 2030. To achieve this, Nissan is streamlining EV engineering by simplifying powertrain designs, consolidating platforms, and reducing the number of powertrains and EV variants. The company is also shifting to software-defined vehicles, deriving revenue from in-vehicle services in the US and European markets, and expanding the functionality and frequency of over-the-air vehicle software updates.

Nissan is taking a big step towards achieving its goals of having more than 40 percent of its US sales be full electric by 2030, as well as 98 percent of its European sales. To do this, the automaker is consolidating platforms and drivetrains for more competitive EVs, as well as streamlining EV engineering by simplifying powertrain designs and reducing the number of powertrains and EV variants. Nissan is also shifting to software-defined vehicles, deriving revenue from in-vehicle services in the US and European markets, and expanding the functionality and frequency of over-the-air vehicle software updates.

Nissan is taking major steps to ensure it can comply with US local sourcing rules for electric vehicle tax credits from 2026. This includes offering six EV nameplates in the US market, such as a next-generation Leaf hatchback and the Ariya crossover, as well as four new models made for the Nissan and Infiniti brands at its Canton, Mississippi, plant. Nissan’s efforts to tap into the tax credits offered under the Inflation Reduction Act will be achieved through compliance with rules on final assembly, content from foreign entities of concern, and the localization of battery components and minerals. The US localization plan will include making electric powertrains locally, potentially revamping the Decherd, Tennessee, engine plant to make EV units, and possibly using a second source for batteries in the US.

Nissan is making sure it is well-prepared to take advantage of the EV tax credits offered under the Inflation Reduction Act by 2026, and is taking steps to ensure it can comply with US local sourcing rules. This includes consolidating platforms and drivetrains for more competitive EVs, streamlining EV engineering by simplifying powertrain designs, and reducing the number of powertrains and EV variants. The automaker is also shifting to software-defined vehicles, deriving revenue from in-vehicle services in the US and European markets, and expanding the functionality and frequency of over-the-air vehicle software updates.

Nissan’s plans to comply with US local sourcing rules for electric vehicle tax credits by 2026 are ambitious and forward-thinking. The automaker is consolidating platforms and drivetrains for more competitive EVs, and streamlining EV engineering by simplifying powertrain designs and reducing the number of powertrains and EV variants. Nissan is also shifting to software-defined vehicles, deriving revenue from in-vehicle services in the US and European markets, and expanding the functionality and frequency of over-the-air vehicle software updates. All of these initiatives are aimed at ensuring that Nissan can take full advantage of the EV tax credits offered under the Inflation Reduction Act by 2026, and that it can reach its goal of having more than 40 percent of its US sales be full electric by 2030, as well as 98 percent of its European sales.

NO COMMENTS

Exit mobile version