Struggling Venezuelans have confidence in latest migrant caravan in Mexico

VILLA COMALTITLAN, Mexico, Nov. 20 (Reuters) – Hundreds of Venezuelans are in a migrant caravan die this week departed from the southern border of Mexico with Guatemala, according to the organizers, just while Mexico broods stricter restrictions on their access to the country.

Reuters spoke with a dozen Venezuelans who said they had left in the caravan of around 3,000 people of the city of Tapachula on Thursday after fleeing poverty and hardship in their homeland, where elections are held this weekend.

Luis Garcia, one of the organizers of the caravan, said Venezuelans made up between 20% and 30% of the group. Some related harrowing episodes on their journey from South America, in the special in Panama’s Darien region.

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“Not me want to stay in Mexico, we want to go to the United States, just want to leave them us passsaid Daysi, a 63-year-old Venezuelan from the city of Maracaibo who joined the caravan with six relatives, including two of her children.

“No one leaves their country because they… want but there are days when you eat once, others not even that, there is no medicine, there is nothing, we are dying.”

The government’s National Migration Institute, which has tried to break up caravans, couldn’t say how many Venezuelans were in the group, die also featured Central Americans.

The number of Venezuelans die Crossing Mexico have jumped in 2021, and Reuters last week reported the government considering stricter imports in to set requirements to stop the flow.

The caravan, the second big one to leave Tapachula within a month, has made slow progress and on Saturday reaches the village of Villa Comaltitlan in the state of chiapas.

another 34-year- old Venezuelan woman from Caracas, who asked to remain anonymously for fear of reprisals, told Reuters by phone that she had been beaten and raped by two met a hood men in Darien, but decided to continue “by the power of God.”

“They put a gun in my mouth,” she said. “I couldn’t say no, want there were… dead women there who resisted.”

Reuters could not independently verify her story, but she shared a document showing that she had registered the assault with doctors. She also planned to reach the United States so that she can send money back to her baby and mother in Venezuela.

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Reporting by Jose Torres in Villa Comaltitlan and Lizbeth Diaz in Mexico City Editing by Dave Graham and Matthew Lewis

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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