The Best 43 inch TV for 2023

The best 40-inch TVs shouldn’t be taken for granted. Even though they don’t have the enormous screen size of the best 65-inch TVs, there are still some huge 40-inch screens. Not only that, but at this size, they are also very cheap. Whether you avoid a big TV to take over your living room or a smaller TV for your bedroom, the best 40-inch TVs listed below will happily show you 4K content.

And don’t let their small size fool you. The best 40-inch TVs don’t give up any features. They have 4K resolution and HDR, which stands for “high dynamic range.” This means that whatever you watch on them, the images will appear, and the colors will be bright. You’ll also get the same innovative TV interfaces with built-in streaming services like Netflix and Disney+, just like their bigger siblings. You can also find one of the best TVs for gaming here. LG’s 43-inch C2 has HDMI 2.1, which lets you connect a PlayStation 5 or Xbox Series X and play games in 4K at 120 frames per second with a variable refresh rate.

One problem with a smaller screen is that only a few of the best OLED TVs are on the list below. Because of how they are made, 40-inch OLED panels are much less common, but LG has solved the problem with the 42-inch C2. You’ll also find that some of the best screens from big brands with the newest technology don’t come in smaller sizes, but there are still many options.

Here is a list of our favorite 40-inch, 42-inch, and 43-inch TVs. And use our tips on how to choose the best TV for you, which you can find below.

BEST  43-INCH TVS FOR 2023

LG OLED42C2

LG OLED42C2
LG OLED42C2

The LG C2 is the first 42-inch OLED 4K TV, which brings this high-end screen technology to small TVs for the first time. If you’re a true movie fan who wants the most cinematic images possible on a TV this size, this is the one for you. Stop looking now; the job is done.

Because each pixel makes its light, scenes with a lot of contrast between light and dark, with authentic black right next to bright lights, look great. You can also see a lot more detail in dark scenes than you can on an LED TV. This is an imposing feature.

It also has all of LG’s newest and best image technology. You get the best image processing, so everything looks sharp and natural on the 4K screen. It also supports HDMI 2.1 on all its HDMI ports, so there’s 4K 120Hz and VRR support for next-gen gaming – this is 100% future-proof. It is, without a doubt, the best small TV for gaming right now.

The sound isn’t as good as the picture, so you should add a small soundbar. It’s also not as bright as the Samsung 43-inch QN90A mini-LED TV… but it’s still more optimistic than almost everything else on the market. It costs a lot, but if you want the most advanced 42-inch TV on the market, this is it. In addition to our review of the LG C2 as a whole (below), we have also tested the 42-inch model to compare.

Vizio V-Series V435-H11 (US)

Vizio V-Series V435-H11 (US)
Vizio V-Series V435-H11 (US)

The V in Vizio’s V-Series TVs has always stood for “value,” but you could easily argue that it should stand for “versatile” since this is one of the most feature-packed TVs in the budget category. The V-Series is the Swiss Army Knife of cheap TVs. It has a built-in Chromecast and AirPlay and supports HDR10, HDR10+, Dolby Vision, and HLG.

The V-Series is reasonably inexpensive, even with all of these technologies. The picture quality is “fair” because the contrast isn’t great, and the colors aren’t very saturated. Its biggest problem is that it looks terrible when viewed from more than 45 degrees off-axis. This quickly turns a good picture into a desaturated mess.

If you can stay perfectly still in front of it, don’t mind the less-than-stellar picture quality, and don’t mind a few speed and performance issues, it’s a cheap TV series that has a lot of the technology that makes LG and Samsung’s best TVs the best in the world.

Samsung BU8500

Samsung BU8500
Samsung BU8500

Samsung’s goal with the BU8500 was to make an excellent all-arounder for a meager price, and it’s done that. For a low cost, you get 4K HDR (but not Dolby Vision), three HDMI ports, voice control, two remotes, and all the apps you could want. It could be better than the best TVs that cost a lot more, but the picture quality is much better than you’d expect for this price. The only real problem is that the speakers need to sound better, but you can add a good soundbar at this price.

The main places where corners have been cut are in processing: the upscaling here isn’t as good on lower-resolution sources as it is on Samsung’s higher-spec models, and while we didn’t find input lag to be a problem, the fact that Samsung didn’t publish the numbers suggests it will be a bit slower than the best gaming TVs. You’ll also lose some multi-HDR support, so you won’t be able to use Dolby Vision even though you’ll get HLG, HDR10, and HDR10+ dynamic metadata (though this is true of all Samsung TVs). At this price, the problems are small enough to be a deal-breaker, and the TV still works very well, but you might notice a big difference in the picture quality on bigger and more expensive TVs.

All things considered, though, this is an excellent set for the price. It’s one of the best Samsung TVs in terms of what you get for your money.

TCL 4-Series

TCL 4-Series
TCL 4-Series

The TCL 4-Series isn’t as exciting as the company’s 6-Series QLED with Mini LED, but it’s a good choice in our best TCL TV guide and an incredible value at around $200.

The 4-Series comes in two different versions, each with another innovative platform: Roku TV or Android TV. The Roku model is much better in terms of performance, usability, and security, so we recommend it.

Disappointingly, the 4-Series doesn’t have all the latest features (no HDMI 2.1, VRR, ALLM, etc.), but it does support HDR10 and HLG, has an 802.11ac wireless antenna built in, and has one HDMI port with ARC, which is excellent for people who want to cut down on the number of remotes in their house.

It’s not the best TCL TV in the world, but if you can only get a 40-inch TV and want access to hundreds of streaming channels, the TCL 4-Series Roku TV is a smart choice and a great deal.

Hisense A7200 Roku TV

Hisense A7200 Roku TV
Hisense A7200 Roku TV

This cheap Hisense TV might be the best way to save money on a new 43-inch TV, but you will have to make some sacrifices.

This TV is a great deal, and the Roku TV platform is always a pleasure to use because of its sleek interface, well-organized tile icons, and wide range of apps. But as a 4K HDR TV, it doesn’t work as well with SD or HD; it’s best to connect it to sources with a high resolution. We weren’t impressed by the sound, either. Some corners have been cut to keep the price so low.

This could be an excellent way to watch 4K content on a budget if you want a cheap TV and are okay with some scratchy audio or bad upscaling.

Samsung QN90B

Samsung QN90B
Samsung QN90B

We’re still finishing up our longer-term review of the Samsung Q90B, but after spending a lot of time with it for our first hands-on review, we can confidently say that it’s a refined and impressive set that offers flagship-level specs for a lower price. This is a quantum dot mini-LED display with excellent color and contrast. The best OLED TVs are better, but it’s much brighter, which makes them a good choice for rooms with a lot of light. It’s not the best choice for watching dark movies, which is why OLED is still the best option, but it’s excellent for CGI-heavy movies, action movies, and colorful TV shows. It’s also great for gaming because it has Xbox game streaming, VRR, and AMD FreeSync Pro Premium already built in.

Most TVs this size don’t have great sound, but this one has Samsung’s Q Symphony, which lets it work with other Samsung soundbars to create a surround sound system. This smaller model doesn’t have Object Tracking Sound Plus like the bigger ones, but it does have the Lite version, which gives you positional audio for a more immersive experience.

Samsung 43QN90A

Samsung 43QN90A
Samsung 43QN90A

This is a minor TV with Samsung’s high-end Neo QLED TV technology. It combines the colors and brightness that QLED is known for with a next-gen mini-LED backlight, which lets even more lights fit into a thinner panel.

In our tests, its peak HDR brightness was well over 1,000 nits, and it can reach nearly 2,000 nits in some modes. Compared to the LG C2, which has 700 nits of brightness, this TV is the exception regarding HDR, which is bright and punchy. And because its tiny LED lights can be turned off in specific places, its contrast between light and dark is much better than the other LCD TVs here, though the OLED TV is still better.

Because Samsung is so good at processing images, you’ll get super-sharp 4K pictures and excellent upscaling. And, like other Samsung TVs, it’s great for gaming because its gaming mode has very low latency… There’s a catch, though. Most sizes of QN90A support 4K at 120Hz and VRR from next-generation consoles, but not this size. The LG C2 is still the best for gamers. But this is the best choice if you want an HDR that is bright enough to see even in a room with a lot of natural light.

Other things to know about buying a 43-inch TV

Is a 40-inch TV Big Enough?

It’s important to remember that 40-inch screens, which used to be the biggest and best, are now small compared to many other TV screens. Manufacturers can now make screens that are bigger than ever before. 55-inch 4K TVs are the norm now, and 65-inch 4K TVs are quickly becoming more popular.

A 40-inch TV should have 4K resolution, but the benefits will be easier to see on a bigger screen. We think a 40-inch TV is a good size for a single person who isn’t too far away, but it’s not great for a family or a group of flatmates.

If you want to know if a 40-inch TV is right for you, measure the space where you want to put it and think about how far your budget can go.

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